Meet Sarah, Family Support Worker

Based in Essex, Sarah works with families in extreme and uncertain situations, so that they don’t have to manage alone. In doing so, Sarah often becomes a trusted and constant person in the lives of the families we work with. Sarah, who recently became a mum to twin girls, talks to us about what inspired her to become a Family Support Worker and what she feels is the most fulfilling aspect of her job.

When did you become a Family Support Worker and what does it mean to you?

I joined Rainbow Trust in 2013 and have been part of the Essex team for nearly 6 years. I have so much respect for the families that we support and find it humbling to be able to support them throughout their journey’s. Whenever people ask me what I do, I get ‘the look’ followed by, ‘I don’t know how you do it!’.

The truth is, I love my job, it ’s a really unique situation when your days are so varied. Sometimes I can be driving a family to appointments, supporting them in hospital or helping at home. Other days I will be playing ninja tag, realising I’m not as fit as I was a few years ago.

What is the most fulfilling aspect of your job?

It’s hard to pick one, but I would say, bringing laughter to a home, even for a short while, is really a special thing. It’s always nice to see children and siblings having fun, but we forget that their parents are human too. After their child is diagnosed, they tend to suddenly have a lot of hats to wear. They go from Mummy or Daddy to Carer, Nurse, Advocate, PA, Taxi driver. They lose their social life and their circle of friends seems to get smaller. I like to remind them that it’s ok to laugh, to have fun and escape the complicated world that they have suddenly been thrown into, even if it’s for half an hour.

You’ve recently started your own family. How are you finding it being a mother to twins?

I cannot begin to explain the love I have for my little family. In all honesty, no one can prepare you for twins, and unless you have twins, you won’t get it! It’s not what we imagined when we planned our first child, but they truly are a blessing. We get double the nappies, double the tears and sleepless nights, but oh my goodness the surplus of kisses and cuddles is so worth it. Two cheeky monkeys are definitely better than one.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Stonewall. As someone who is in a same-sex couple, what does Gay Pride mean to you?

My wife and I are so lucky to have supportive friends and family and we also live in a great community. We recently attended Gay Pride in our local town and found it amazing to see the diverse families who attended. It highlights acceptance and tolerance. All we want is for our girls to grow up to be kind, caring individuals who understand that everyone is different.