The first ever Children’s Grief Awareness Week

Arlene Honeyman, Head of Care Strategic Development at Rainbow Trust, talks about the importance of support services for children who find themselves experiencing grief and why Rainbow Trust is supporting the first ever Children’s Grief Awareness Week this 19-25 November.

The stat released today reveals that one in 29 school age children in the UK have been bereaved of a parent or sibling. This brings to light the importance of support services for children who find themselves experiencing grief. Children experience grief in a vast number of ways, and there is no one size fits all model of support. Grief can be felt for the rest of a person’s life after the death of a parent or sibling, it’s not only an immediate reaction or something that can be planned or controlled.

Rainbow Trust is supporting the first ever Children’s Grief Awareness Week (19 to 25 November) as a member of the Child Bereavement Network. Parents and carers shouldn’t have to cope alone. Family, friends, colleagues, schools and the government all have a part to play in helping to support grieving children. Specialist services should be available for all bereaved children and their families, wherever they live and however they have been bereaved, helping them realise that they are not alone. It is important that support is offered for as long as it is needed and that children are able to ask questions and feel they have someone to talk to, and this can be in and outside of the family unit. It is vital that organisations with the expertise to deliver this specialist care work hand in hand to ensure that no child or parent slips through the net. Rainbow Trust is currently offering bereavement support to more than ninety families. This includes one to one and family work, and Tribute days to remember brothers and sisters who have died.

Click here for more information on how Rainbow Trust provides support.